GIVING BACK IS GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

3 Good Reasons
to Give Back.

EXPERIENCE GROWTH

By taking part in giving back, and participating philanthropic + humanitarian based activities, we become aware of our emotional intelligence. By giving, volunteering, and donating, our emotional awareness increases and we have the opportunity to become more aware of ourselves and of others. Being able to feel true gratitude and give back is part of the human experience.

BECOME A RESOURCE

If you know that you need to share your resources with somebody, and if you are dedicated to sharing your gifts with others, you will immediately become more conscious about what it is that you have to offer and naturally, you will become more willing and excited to share those resources. If you’re anything like us, chances are that having a mentor in your life is a game changer. Be willing to get more involved with your network.

MAKE MORE HEALTHY CHOICES

Physically, giving back can increase your levels of wellbeing in general. Studies show that when you give back to society, you experience a personal boost in morale, increased feelings of joy and overall lower stress levels. Giving back feels good because it gives us a greater purpose; having purpose, naturally exudes positivity through our mind, body, and soul. You can start living better by doing better.

Giving back creates space
for growth in your personal
and professional life.

Join us on July 10th for Networking & Giving Back!

Donate to the NICU by clicking here.
give.nyp.org/goto/GWGWG

RSVP & Buy Tickets to our event here.


More about our charitable partners —

Phyllis and David Komansky Children’s Hospital:

For more than a century, we have led the way in the care and treatment of infants, children, and adolescents. NewYork-Presbyterian is the top-rated children’s hospital in New York, according to U.S. News & World Report, placing us in an elite group of the top academic medical centers in this field.

At the Komansky Children’s Hospital at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, we provide care to over 650 critically ill babies and over 4,000 children each year. The Komansky Children’s Hospital has a 50-bed neonatal intensive care unit, a 19-bed pediatric intensive care unit, and a 30-bed general pediatrics unit.

Phyllis and David Komansky Children’s Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU):

A Tradition of Excellence

NewYork-Presbyterian’s neonatology program is ranked #8 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, and our NICU has had better survival rates than the Vermont-Oxford Network average (a consortium of over 900 NICUs around the world) for the last nine years. Our excellence in this area has made us a popular destination for new mothers from New York City and beyond.

The strength of the Komansky Children’s Hospital’s neonatology service lies in our attention to detail, from the delivery room to the NICU. We closely monitor and manage infants’ temperature, breath, oxygen intake, and more, so that when they arrive in the NICU, they have the best possible chance to survive and thrive. Once they are in the NICU, we do everything possible to keep them alive and healthy, including methods pioneered by our doctors, and we do so with endless reservoirs of dedication and compassion.

Building the NICU of the Future

In summer 2020, the Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns will open. When completed, this hospital will triple the space available to care for women and newborns, while making it possible for our physicians to preside over an additional 1,500 deliveries a year.

The current Komansky Children’s Hospital NICU will be moving across the street to the Cohen Hospital, and it will be larger, more comfortable, and more technologically advanced than ever. The new Komansky Children’s Hospital NICU will offer 60 private rooms with ample space for infants and their families to bond—one of only a few units of its kind in New York with this amenity. It will be equipped with an operating room; a neonatal ECMO service; as well as laboratory testing, pharmacy, and nutritional support capabilities appropriate for the special needs of infants born prematurely. The unit will also host state-of-the-art electronic monitoring in support of our outstanding nursing team. It will be the only NICU in New York with a dedicated MRI on-site, eliminating the need to transport fragile babies to other areas of the Hospital.

Jaclyn DeJesus